New app for teens ‘Yellow’

Dear Parents/Carers,

It has come to the attention of the Middle school Year Coordinators that a new app is being used by many students called ‘Yellow’ that can be downloaded freely from the App store. It has marketed itself as an opportunity to meet new people; however, some girls may be using this more as a ‘dating website’ to meet boys. We are concerned that students are interacting with people that they do not know, meeting up with them without the knowledge of others and could be sending images of a sexualised nature. Please see the news article excerpt below:

Australian children targeted by sexual predators on new app Yellow

CHILDREN are being targeted by sexual predators through a disturbing new app dubbed “Tinder for teens” with multiple cases of child grooming referred to police, a cyber safety expert has warned.

The app, Yellow, reportedly has five million users and is growing in popularity among Australian school-aged teenagers keen to “make amazing new chat friends”.

The worrying app is marketed to children, and combines the swipe mechanism and “match” features of Tinder to connect kids with Instagram and Snapchat’s photo editing and messaging services.

Once users start chatting on the app, they are given the option to add each other instantly on photo-sharing app Snapchat and continue their “friendship”.

Along with security concerns, there have been reports of children being pressured to send nude photographs and being coaxed into explicit sexual conversation while using the app.

According to cyber safety expert and former police officer Susan McLean, that’s just the beginning.

Liz Burke   NOVEMBER 28, 2016

 

CHILDREN are being targeted by sexual predators through a disturbing new app dubbed “Tinder for teens” with multiple cases of child grooming referred to police, a cyber safety expert has warned.

The app, Yellow, reportedly has five million users and is growing in popularity among Australian school-aged teenagers keen to “make amazing new chat friends”.

The worrying app is marketed to children, and combines the swipe mechanism and “match” features of Tinder to connect kids with Instagram and Snapchat’s photo editing and messaging services.

Once users start chatting on the app, they are given the option to add each other instantly on photo-sharing app Snapchat and continue their “friendship”.

Along with security concerns, there have been reports of children being pressured to send nude photographs and being coaxed into explicit sexual conversation while using the app.

According to cyber safety expert and former police officer Susan McLean, that’s just the beginning.

 

For the rest of the article, http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/parenting/teens/australian-children-targeted-by-sexual-predators-on-new-app-yellow/news-story/e79fc5a502e62e7f4c5bde2cbd9315c1

 

Our aims are to prevent the misuse of social media and put a stop to online bullying, and other forms of abuse online. We work hard to assist the girls with strategies to keep themselves safe. As year coordinators we are explicit in our teaching around safe social media usage, for example addressing issues of concern in our year assemblies’ that we are aware of and that occur during school hours. Year groups have also participated in a number of pastoral workshops where experts address up to date and relevant social media issues and the PDHPE syllabus reinforces this by addressing a number of issues around personal safety and recognising bullying behaviours.

We are concerned that our girls are interacting with each other, and others out of the school community, inappropriately and this is impacting them both inside and outside the school. While most contact is happening outside of school hours, this is then carried over into the school environment causing disruption to lessons and having a negative impact on their relationships with their peers and their ability to concentrate and get the most out of their learning experiences here at the College.

We would like to encourage you to have an open conversation about this to your daughter, about what is appropriate use and some of the inappropriate ways people can behave online.

If your daughter experiences or witnesses bullying, or is requested for any inappropriate images/content – the best option is to take a screenshot and inform the school and/or police immediately.

For more information on how you can help your daughter, see the following websites:

https://www.esafety.gov.au/education-resources/iparent/online-risks/online-pornography/online-pornography-and-young-people

https://www.esafety.gov.au/education-resources/iparent/staying-safe/social-networking

https://bullyingnoway.gov.au/

 

Lara Grimm & Katrine Barnes

(Middle School Coordinators)